1970 Ford Mk2 Cortina

 

Wednesday the 2nd April 2014 was a special day for Adam, he finally got a Mark 2 Cortina to add to his 1975 Mk2 Capri. She is a 1970 Ford Cortina Mk2 4 door Sedan Deluxe (we think). She has the bench seat with a 4 speed on the column.  We have bought her as a project from an awesome, honest petrolhead gentleman, yes Chad you were great to deal with…  Many Many thanks. We collected it from Dunedin and trailered it home (7 hour round trip).  Many thanks goes to Cussie Al for all his advice, muscle and help and also to Norm (Nathan Gill) for letting us use his trailer and his advice as well.

Our wee girl is motorless, has some rust but she is a pretty good survivor. The interior is the lovely (not) tan colour with no carpets. She is going to be a long project (probably a year).

Things to do: Change colour of interior, put in carpets: Build up new motor and install: Rust removal: Repaint car:  We are hoping to do 90% of all the work ourselves.

Stay tuned for progress pic’s etc….

Here is Adam’s first progress pic… THE RESTORE HAS STARTED!!! OMG!!

Just click on any picture to enlarge it.

WEEK 1 – 7th April 2014

Adam stripped down a set of old 13″ Rostyles and completely restored them

13" Rostyle with Chrome Band

13″ Rostyle with Chrome Band

We started cleaning the interior for the colour change

Cleaning up the Interior first

Cleaning up the Interior first

The back seat was the first to get the change… Looks good so are going to carry on with it all..

Interior Changing colour

Interior Changing colour

We had our engine mechanic (Ricky) pop over and he had a look at the old 1300 motor.. She be really goosed.. see the smashed piston…

1300 block dead piston

1300 block dead piston

1300 old block crank

1300 old block crank

So he inspected the 1600 motor and she is looking great!!!  Only a small amount of work is required.. WAHOO!!

1600 block

1600 block

1600 Head

1600 Head

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The strip out of the interior has started…

Interior Strip-out

Interior Strip-out

The 1 speaker lol...

The 1 speaker lol…

Rear floor

Rear floor

Parcel Shelf

Parcel Shelf

Parts bench

Parts bench

Headlining

Headlining

Fronts rear Passenger

Fronts rear Passenger

Floors Front Passenger side

Floors Front Passenger side

Floors front

Floors front

Then onto the cleaning and scrapping and looking for rust.  OMG!!  This is a real survivor!!  Floors are in great condition.  We wirebrushed and then treated the floor to a Rustkill experience… Then painted it in Black Deadoner.

Floors treated and deadoned

Floors treated and deadoned

Floors treated and deadoned 2

Floors treated and deadoned 2

Floors treated and deadoned 3

Floors treated and deadoned 3

We pushed the old girl into the garage (the poor Capri is left outside!!.. Only for 1x night.. we promise…) so we could remove the grill and light surrounds.  And ‘bugger me’ everything is damn well riverted in.  The car has had no frontal impacts in its 44 years of life.. We are so impressed.  So now we are cleaning up the grill etc.. BTW, the rear tail lights are still riverted in as well…

Grill & headlight surrounds

Grill & headlight surrounds

Stripped Front of Cortina

Stripped Front of Cortina

We have found a liitle bit of rot under the front of the bonnet so we have stripped it back and rustkilled it and it is ready for the ol’ grinder and welder..

Bonnent

Bonnet

She is looking all tucked in for the night…

Cortina now in garage

Cortina now in garage

So Sundays job is to paint, paint and paint…

Seats ready for painting

Seats ready for painting

WEEK 2

The 1st week went well and there were only a few cuts and loss of blood was kept to a miminum..lol… Week2 Adam got started on the dents and little spots of surface rust… With on going Painting and painting and painting..lol…

Cleaning up Front end

Cleaning up Front end

Painted Back Seat

Painted Back Seat

Painted Grill

Painted Grill

Repainted headlining

Repainted headlining

The sun visors are shot so they have been taken apart are are going to be rebuilt, same for the tin side back pillars.

Sunvisors&Mirror getting redone

Sunvisors & Mirror getting redone

Side Tin Pillar covers

Side Tin Pillar covers

The back shelf has seen better days so a new one is going to be made including speaker holes..

Parcel Tray Before

Parcel Tray Before

The old radio and shelf have come out, shelf to be painted and the radio… well.. any offers??

Shelf and Std Radio 1970

Shelf and Std Radio 1970

We needed a hand to undo the 45 year old bloody stuck bolts that kept the towbar on… but it is finally off!!

Remove Towbar

Remove Towbar

WEEK 3

Well, with the Cortina underway, the call was made to build a shed/lean-to to house the Capri while the build carries on… We had a couple of ‘glitchs’ along the way but she got there… Only a door and a couple of touches to go…

The shortest and least productive week spent on the Cortina. Easter was here, and time was spent building a new lock-up which will eventually house the car. At the moment it’s home to the almighty Capri.

The new lock-up, just have to get a couple of door made and she'll be set!

The new lock-up, just have to get a couple of door made and she’ll be set!

Visors and mirror.

Visors and mirror.

Foam inside had turned to a fine sand.

Foam inside had turned to a fine sand.

Painting the disgusting brown door cards.

Painting the disgusting brown door cards.

Brown steering wheel painted with many coats of black, followed with just as many clear coats.

Brown steering wheel painted with many coats of black, followed with just as many clear coats.

Steering wheel centre.

Steering wheel centre.

Dash - before.

Dash – before.

Dash - before.

Dash – before.

Gauges. Masked around and re-painted the silver. Once dried, will re-mask and paint the rest of the dash black.

Gauges. Masked around and re-painted the silver. Once dried, will re-mask and paint the rest of the dash black.

Dash-top had two cracks in the usual place. Masked up the outer-area and used this black goo that the guy at the local hardware store said people stick body-kits on with. Worked really well, but a bit of a pain as it didn't sand too well. Painted a coat of paint over it last night, will see how she looks today.

Dash-top had two cracks in the usual place. Masked up the outer-area and used this black goo that the guy at the local hardware store said people stick body-kits on with. Worked really well, but a bit of a pain as it didn’t sand too well. Painted a coat of paint over it last night, will see how she looks today.

Dash-top.

Dash-top.

Brown steering wheel painted with many coats of black, followed with just as many clear coats.

Brown steering wheel painted with many coats of black, followed with just as many clear coats.

Armrests - all painted, drying on the clothesline.

Armrests – all painted, drying on the clothesline.

Cleaning up engine bay before we eventually put the motor back in. Wasn't in too bad a shape, but the under-body seal will help keep it protected.

Cleaning up engine bay before we eventually put the motor back in. Wasn’t in too bad a shape, but the under-body seal will help keep it protected.

WEEK 4

Things stalled a bit this week, but we got some stuff done..

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While I was out on a garage raid we came across the ultimate Mk1 Cortina.. Yes a genuine Lotus and a 1500GT

 

Well, its been ages and ages… but we got stuck back in and made some great head way.  Yes, it’s been a year since we bought the old girl… Its now April 2015 and the interior is complete.. oh well.. 98%…  The rubber paint job has been finished, oh god, never again… lol… Oh, well it was worth the éxperience’….

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The Cortina.. Our beginings

 

FORD CORTINA

963,750 Cortina’s were produced

After getting off to such a flying start, it’s no surprise that Ford stuck to its winning formula with the second generation Cortina. Although the first car was immaculately engineered and costed, its high-fashion styling dated rather quickly. And as a result, that led it having a short shelf life – something that the company had planned for when putting together Project Archbishop. Once again, the new car’s styling took its cues from the USA, with its design chief Roy Haynes clearly being inspired by the neat minimalism that was sweeping through the Ford empire at the time. So, a mere four years after the Cortina Mk1 rolled out of Dagenham, the Mk2 version followed suit.

But it was a look that worked, and more importantly, this car proved Ford’s undoubted commitment to giving customers exactly what they wanted. And in an expanding market, what they wanted was more space, more performance and more equipment. So, with the advertising strapline, ‘New Cortina is more Cortina’, did exactly what the advertising copywriters asked of it. The new car was wider with a more capacious interior, and had a larger boot (even though engineers on the Mk1 felt that the original’s was already on the generous side of capacious). Driver comfort and ease of use were also factored in, with the increasingly luxurious interior complemented the softer ride and more ‘grown up’ feel of the new car.

It was the same story with the power units – the 1.2-litre engine may have been the entry level for the original car, but for the UK market, that was upped to 1.3-litres. The smaller 1.2-litre engine was offered in export markets, but for the UK market, this was not offered, as the higher engine capacity equated to a higher price in a buoyant market, where confidence was riding at an all-time high. The larger entry level model didn’t initially lead to an increase in size of the range-topper (which stayed at 1.5-litres), but it was only a matter of time, as Ford engineers were beavering away at a 1.6-litre crossflow version of its Kent four-cylinder.

As before, the Cortina was offered in two- and four-door saloon form, as well as a capacious five-door estate, and it was the latter that proved to be a massive hit for the company, following the slow start of its wood-clad predecessor.

The new crossflow heads were introduced in 1967, and saw a corresponding expansion of the range. The most iconic of them all was the 1600E, which now topped an expanding range that comprised of base, Deluxe, Super, GT and 1600E. It was the Cortina 1600E that truly captured the public’s imagination, when it was unveiled at the 1967 Paris Motor Show. The exterior was treated to a number of well judged modifications, such as Rostyle wheels, a black rear panel and vinyl roof – but it went as well as it looked, thanks to being powered by the 1600GT’s uprated Kent engine and uprated suspension. Inside, the 1600E was rather special, too, featuring a burr walnut woodgrain-trimmed dashboard and door cappings, bucket seats, that all-important sports steering wheel, and full six-pack instrumentation.

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After more than a million Mk.I Cortinas, the Mk.II appeared in autumn 1966, sitting on the same floorpan, but looking a whole lot different. It was the same length and had the same wheelbase, but two inches of extra width (64.9″) and increased track widths (52.5″ front, 51″ rear) managed to make it appear larger, with its simple, clean, contemporary styling – perhaps not as interesting a design, but still easy on the eye. In fact, not all that much had changed under the bonnet, either. Same engine (64 bhp at 4500 rpm and 89 lbs/ft at 2500 rpm for the 1500), same gearbox, same rear suspension with a few adjustments for a wider track, but a few changes had been made to the front suspension. Steering was lighter, and the turning circle was smaller. Top speed was about 85 mph, 0-60 mph was around 19.0 – 19.5 seconds.

In 1967 everyone in Dagenham took a bit of a holiday for the summer of love, perhaps to listen for hidden messages in ‘Sgt. Peppers’, but they all re-emerged in August with what is now commonly called the ‘crossflow’ version of the Kent engine. This engine used a new cylinder head which had virtually no combustion chamber, and used crossflow porting. Combustion now took place in the top of the piston crown, and while the exhaust manifold remained on the left side of the engine, the inlet manifold and carby were over on the other side. The battery also migrated across to the left side of the engine bay. The new engines had also been stroked, the 1200 (1198 cc) engine becoming a 1300 (1297 cc), and the 1500 (1498 cc) growing up to 1600 (1599 cc). This new engine improved both performance and fuel economy at the same time. The 1600 lifted the top speed slightly to 87 mph, while 0-60 mph dropped down closer to 18 seconds. Bhp was up to 71 at 5000 rpm, while maximum torque was 91.5 lbs/ft at 2500 rpm. The carburettor was now an Autolite instead of a Solex. Other changes were more padding in the dashboard and recessed gauges and instruments.

October 1968 saw a small facelift, with a new grille and new interior, and the handbrake was moved to the transmission tunnel at long last (although Ford Australia’s Falcon still featured an under-dash handbrake into the early 90′s, so don’t complain). A slicker shifter was installed, along with an automatic choke, a high-output generator, an aluminised exhaust system, and a heavy-duty heater.

Late ’69 saw the replacement of the generator with an alternator. The Mk.II made it into the first year of the ’70s, and like the Mk.I, over one million were built.

 

Australia


The Mk.II made its debut in Australia in 1968. The model line up was the same as with the Mk.I – 220 (two-door 1200 / 1300), 240 (two-door 1500 / 1600), 440 (four-door 1500 / 1600), and the GT. Again, the Lotus-Cortina was not offered, nor was the 1600E. In 1968 a 220 cost $1808 (we went decimal in ’66), a 440 $2130, and an automatic 440 $2355. It should be noted here that automatics had only become an option with the Mk.II. A 240 could be distinguished externally from a 220 by the use of chrome strips on the rear edges, front and rear window mylar mouldings, and the fitment of a door mirror.

Ford managed to shift about 17000 Cortinas in 1968, with the biggest market competitor being Volkswagen. Morris (1100 and its derivatives), Hillman (Hunter) and Vauxhall (Viva) were also contesting in the same market segment. By this stage Mazda, Datsun and Toyota were also making their presence felt. The Mk.II sold through to late 1971 in Australia, when it was replaced by the Mk.III, more commonly known in Australia as the TC Cortina, which was followed by the TD. Just for interest’s sake, I’ll mention that all Mk.III and Mk.IV Cortinas (TE and TF) Cortinas were available with 200 ci (3.3 litre) and 250 ci (4.1 litre) straight sixes as used in the local Falcon models. Don’t get too excited – sure they were quick, but the handling sucked…

 

USA

 

Description: Article

PACER FROM FORD’S BRITISH STABLE – In the compact Cortina, the company is betting it has another Mustang-type winner. And the devaluation of the pound may give it an edge over rivals VW and Opel in the U.S. import market.
‘Business Week’, November 25 1967

The Mk.II Cortina was introduced to the US market in mid-February 1967. As evidenced in the image below, sent to me by Ron Bruner, each Mk.II Cortina was driven into the Atlantic, and emerged somewhere on the East Coast ready to sell (after the barnacles were removed from the underside of course). As evidenced by the image on the left, also sent to me by Ron Bruner (thanks mate!), the car was promoted as the ‘Model C’, which is just what in seems these days – a lame attempt to give the car some sort of ‘vehicle for the masses’ aura like the Model T. Available were two and four-door sedans ($1815 and $1935), a wagon ($2152), all with optional automatic transmissions, and two and four-door GTs ($2172 and $2291). The new model, touted as having a ‘distinctly American flair’, actually lifted EnFo sales quite dramatically, from 7932 in 1966, to 16193 in 1967, with the Anglia 1200 being the only other model sold.

Early 1968 saw the Cortinas worldwide pick up the crossflow engine as detailed elsewhere, but later in the year the American models subjected to a number of changes due to Federal safety regulations. Two separate amber turn signal lamps were mounted on the grille, inside each headlamp. Side markers went on each front fender, and at the rear of the station wagon. Cortinas in all markets around the world also received more dashboard padding and recessed knobs and gauges this year, perhaps done by Dagenham at Ford USA’s behest? By now the Cortina was the sole EnFo product, and 22983 were imported into the USA, making this the peak year for Cortina sales in the USA.

For 1969 the park/and signal lamps migrated down to under the bumper. The success of the Cortina in the previous year obviously encouraged Ford to expand the Cortina line-up, and two new base models appeared this year, though all cars featured the 1600, the smaller 1200/1300 never being available for the Mk.II in the USA. The old level of appointment became a ‘Deluxe’, accompanied by a hefty price hike, but the new standard models were less than the previous year’s models. The range was the standard two and four-door ($1849 and $1964), the two and four-door Deluxe ($1932 and $2047), the station wagon ($2270), and two and four-door GTs ($2313 and $2430). An automatic cost $216. This expanded line-up didn’t improve Cortina sales, which remained steady at 21496.

1970 was the last year a Cortina was sold in the USA. Sales dwindled down to 10216, and the notorious Pinto took up the slack – a superior car (that is, if you think a car that bursts into flame when hit from behind is superior). This signalled the end of EnFo operations. This year’s cars had larger side marker lenses, the generator replaced with an alternator, and were fitted with emission control equipment. Prices rose again, the standard two and four-doors being $1889 and $2004 respectively, the two and four-door Deluxes being $1977 and $2092, the wagon $2304, the two-door GT $2358, and the four-door GT $2475. An automatic was still $216, while the ‘Standard Catalog of Imported Cars’ notes that whitewall ‘tires’ (I hate that spelling) were $33. Cool.

 

Canada


David Alexander (Alberta, Canada) supplied the following information:

GT and Deluxe models in 69 and 70 had ‘deep embossed’ vinyl on central portions of seating surfaces, and switched to a locking steering wheel/long ignition key in 1970. The headliner switched from a stars design to spongy look around 69. GT models had full length console in 69 and 70 with shorter consoles on earlier units. Starting in 69, GTand Deluxe models sported the bright metal trim on window frames, wheel openings/rocker panels and the 2 horizontal strips on the rear with the matte black center. Radial tires became standard on GTs here around 1969.

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Decode your old FORD

or..

This was really hard to find but it looks like New Zealand got to change the colour codes to there own making..

On an original ford motor company of New Zealand limited paint chart

stamped on it is palmer & doak ltd

there where nine colours

- quick silver metallic
- glacier white
- cool green
- starlight blue metallic
- zircon green metallic
- pastel yellow
- hot orange
- blue ice
- bronze wine metallic

or

MK2 Cortina

For Australian cars. Same basic application of numbers and letters as in the MK1 Cortina

Example: CG74HG
C= Australia built
G = Broadmeadows, H = Brisbane, K = Sydney.
The two numbers next say the model type 74, 76 & 78
Followed by another two letters which refers to year and date of manufacture

74

220 & 240

76

440

78

GT & GT-L

91

Lotus

Below explains the month and year of manufacture. so using the example above, the 2 letters after the number CG74HG you will get the year and month of your car

Month built

G = 1967

H = 1968

J = 1969

K = 1970

L = 1971

January

C

B

J

L

C

February

K

R

U

Y

K

March

D

A

M

S

D

April

E

G

P

T

E

May

L

C

B

J

L

June

Y

K

R

U

Y

July

S

D

A

M

S

August

T

E

G

P

T

September

J

L

C

B

J

October

U

Y

K

R

U

November

M

S

D

A

M

December

P

T

E

G

P

 

Model code explaination for 1967 models

MODEL CODE

BODY TYPE

12712

’220′ 2 door

12714

’240′ 2 door Deluxe bucket seats

12733

’440′ 4 door Deluxe bench seat

12734

’440′ 4 door Deluxe buckets seats

12738

‘GT’ Sedan 4 door bucket seats

Model code explaination for 1968 models

MODEL CODE

BODY TYPE

12812

’220′ 2 door

12814

’240′ 2 door Deluxe bucket seats

12833

’440′ 4 door Deluxe bench seat

12834

’440′ 4 door Deluxe buckets seats

12838

‘GT’ Sedan 4 door bucket seats

Model code explaination for 1969 to early70 models

MODEL CODE

BODY TYPE

12912

’220′ 2 door

12914

’240′ 2 door Deluxe bucket seats

12916

’240L’ 2 door

12933

’440′ 4 door Deluxe bench seat

12934

’440′ 4 door Deluxe buckets seats

12935

’440′ L 4 door Deluxe bench seat

12936

’440′ L 4 door Deluxe buckets seats

12938

‘GT’ Sedan 4 door bucket seats

12939

‘GT L’ Sedan 4 door bucket seats

Model code explanation for 1971 models

MODEL CODE

BODY TYPE

12133 or 12033

’440′ 4 door Deluxe bench seat

12134 or 12034

’440′ 4 door Deluxe buckets seats

12135 or 12035

’440′ L 4 door Deluxe bench seat

12136 or 12036

’440′ L 4 door Deluxe buckets seats

12138 or 12038

‘GT’ Sedan 4 door bucket seats

12139 or 12039

‘GT L’ Sedan 4 door bucket seats

Engine code

ENGINE CODE

L

D

F

TYPE

79 cid or 1300cc

91cid or1500 & 1600cc

91cid or 1500 & 1600cc ‘GT’

Transmission code

TRANSMISSION CODE

V

T

X

Z

TYPE

4 speed Floor shift

4 speed Column shift

4 speed ‘GT close ratio’

3 speed Automatic

 

Engine number prefex sometimes found 12CA =1200 15CA=1500

MK2 Cortina paint codesPaint codes to help MK2 owners. Two tone colors are the same as MK1 Cortinas1967 models
CODE

COLOUR

CODE

COLOUR

CODE

COLOUR

F

Sultan maroon (met)

G

Horizon blue

1

Platinum blue

K

Silver grey (met)

O

Sage gold (met)

Q

Wheatfield beige

W

Vista green

X

Ivy green (met)

Y

Radiant bronze (met)

A/E

Polar White

B

Onyx black

1968 models

CODE

COLOUR

CODE

COLOUR

CODE

COLOUR

A

Springtime yellow

D

Luster bronze (met)

F

Vintage burgundy (met)

G

Candy apple red

H

Green haze

K

Starlight blue (met)

1

Mountain blue

L/Q

Saffron beige)

R

Sappphire blue (met)

A/E

Polar White

W

Frosted pewter (met)

S/X

Stratosphere grey (met)

Z

Zircon green (met)

4

Harmony grey

5

Cruise blue

1969 onwards models

CODE

COLOUR

CODE

COLOUR

CODE

COLOUR

A

Springtime yellow

D

Luster bronze (met)

F

Vintage burgundy (met)

G

Candy apple red

H

Track red

K

Starlight blue (met)

L

Limelight (met)

M

Reef green (met)

N

Opal glow

A/E

Polar White

O

Yellow ochre

R

Diamond white

6

Vermillion fire

8

Silver fox (met)

9

Nugget gold (met)

2

Bronze wine (met)

Y

Grecian gold (met)

T

True blue

U

Ultra white

X

Monza green

W

Spring frost

B

Onyx black

C

Imperial burgundy

E

Quick silver (met)